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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 235 (some duplicates have been removed)
are approached or anything happens in your professional lives with the united states government that you have any questions about, please come to this committee. we take the work of whistle- blowers and people who give testimony very seriously. you have been critical to bring out things which would not have -- which would not have come out to. i will close with two comments. that i took away from today. he did not produce security at -- you do not reduce security at the -- the same time as you are increasing hazardous duty pay. it does not make sense. i have not heard that question asked and answered. i only heard that it occurred. i think the state department to take away from today and understanding that that sends a message that says, we will pay you for the risk. we will not pay to have you made safer. that is the impression that anyone would get if you reduce the staffing below recommendations or request an increase the pay. i do not think the men and women who service overseas want. i know the compensation for hardship is important, but safety comes first. i have the marine fellow who work
at this in terms of the united states, because as i've said several times, if you want to understand civil religion, just get a tent, and park yourself in the paper plate and the napkin section of k-mart or wal-mart, and as the year goes by, watch the colors change. you've got your valentine's day with the reds and whites, and then we've got st. patty's day, and then i don't know how bunnies and easter eggs and - well, i kind of do - but you've got your yellow and your purple for easter and then we move through memorial day. and fourth of july, memorial day, these are classic civil religious holidays, and if you'll go back and think about our functions of myth - answer profound life questions about meaning, reverence for the past, hope for the future, guide behavior, worshiping of heroes and heroines - all the functions of myth that we see in a religious context are there in a culture to do exactly the same thing: to bind people together as a group, just as it does in religion, where we see it out in the culture, and it's fun to see how that works. it's very - it's difficult because the leaders, th
assistance today, we will be able to take a broad look at how the arab world is looking at the united states and the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particul
. obviously, the campaign is for the united states senate. the filibuster has been used in this current united states senate all a long. hasn't been accused? >> i think every party will always see the other party abuses. i like the system. i like the requirement because to get 60 votes. requires working across the aisle. i think that's something i'm well-suited for. so i would not vote to get rid of the filibuster. sometimes it is abused by both parties. >> from 1917-1970, 50 cloture vote. this current senate, 109th cloture vote. what is going on? >> you have a dysfunctional senate. we haven't had a budget passed innocent in more than three years but someone mentioned the other day the last time the senate passed the budget, the apple ipad had not been invented yet. >> how can it be functional is the filibuster is always wearing its had? >> they can. we've had the filibuster for years and with a functional senate. as senator mccain said the other day this is the first time in 51 years that the senate hasn't passed a defense authorization bill. the problem right now, i don't think we will convi
union. they looked at the united states and thought if they have a common market, same rules and regulations that it would be a huge boost to the economy. those two reasons still exist. i think they will still model through because the alternative is potentially so bad. i could be wrong. you will see good news, bad news. it will work -- it will not work. they cannot do it all at once. they have the will. the politicians say there is no plan be. -- plan b. >> let's just keep globetrotting for second. the international financial meetings in japan. one thing coming out is the imf predictions for the slowdown in global economic growth. alcoa announced this morning the drop-off of global demand for aluminum which is sending an indicator. are you seeing the same thing in your business operations? you are a truly international institutions. are using a sign a slowdown? >> not quite like that. europe is in a mild recession. the government is going to spend 50% of the money. that will not go down. asia is a slower but it is nothing mystical or different than your read about. united st
at the united states because as you have said that has happened too often in the past. that tragedy should occur we have to step in without any margin for error, enough time for preparation to take over the responsibilities for the biggest job in the world, that of running this great country of ours, to take over the awesome responsibility for commanding the nuclear weaponry that this country has. the debate tonight is a debate about a presidential decision that has to be made by you. the stakes could not be higher. >> moderator: senator bentsen question for you and you have two minutes to respond. what bothers people was not so much for qualification, but your split on policy with governor dukakis. he has said that he does not want to clone himself, but you disagree with him on some major issues, a that the in nicaragua conference, did the death penalty, gun-control among others. if you had to step into the presidency, whose agenda would you pursue, yours or his? >> i am delighted to respond to that question. because we agree on so many things and in the best majority of the issues, we agree on
to the world of finance and business in the united states. the wait is going to work today to see and i are going to have this conversation for a few minutes and then we will open it up to you for your questions. one or two conflicts of interest in the table. jpmorgan chase is a corporate member of the council on foreign relations. whenever a 175 corporate converse amanda shareholders the company. i'm forsch landed distinct minority shareholder and i wish it weren't have to present a conflict, but alas it's not. so there you go. mr. dimon is suspect and if you know is that greek heritage. in the last 24 hours the chancellor of germany has been visiting the country of your ancestors of their forebears. how worried are you and what it might mean, not just for grace and not sonatas for europe, but because of globalization and economic linkages for the united states and for your own institution. >> thank you for your introduction. my ancestors 1915 chemists you can't blame me for what's going on there. as a sidenote now, meant my grandfather coming home years ago and greeks from both sides
of the united states. lou: deeming like everybody feels about joe biden? [laughter] >> he is only 42 years old. [laughter] needs to look like he is someone who can step in. i think this is a more important tax for paul ryan tonight. joe biden is not a widely respected figure. better numbers their show. four years ago he was a highly respected -- they liked figure. but the four years have been very hard in the public eye and have taken a serious toll on him. tonight, though, paul ryan faces a guy still be warm and have a charming way about him. paul ryan has to make sure that he doesn't get out politician on that stage. lou: it is also another thing to me. he loves to talk about the deficit and the budget. the fact is, i wonder if there is a line between his energy and his enthusiasm and some constraint and the desire for most of us to hear and speak about other topics as well. and to do so with fresh and new language. can he overdo the youthful enthusiasm and what could quickly become under budget, a johnny one note approach? >> i think he can. i have known him for 20 years. he is very funny a
established a colony in mexico. >> the romneys had left the united states and went to mexico to avoid persecution, but it's also to pursue polygamy. >> narrator: miles romney had five wives and 30 children. >> they built a ranch and he's back in stone age conditions with no money. romney's father is now on the scene. that gets destroyed by guerrillas. they move back to california, poverty again. they build it back up. they move back to salt lake city. they build it back up. romney's whole history of a family is that they knocked us down, we built it back up. we didn't make a fortune; we made a bunch of fortunes. and they resented us for our success, but we kept coming back. that's romney's history. >> with someone with a name with romney you heard about the sufferings of your ancestors and their sacrifices and all they've done that you feel like, well, it's my turn now; i've got to pick up the baton and run with it. >> narrator: but mitt and his family rarely tell the story to outsiders. >> it's an incredible history. he can't talk about it because it involves polygamy. and so if the
. as president of the united states, that diplomat core works for him. and he nominates those ambassadors. so what we need to do when the united states has been attacked, when the americans have been killed while serving our country, we don't need to have mitt romney and the republicans in congress taking their first instinct, being to take cheap political shots -- >> hold on a minute, because it was not about what mitt romney which was clumsy in its own way, but the suggestion that ambassador rice made statements that were blaming -- this video -- >> piers. >> it must have been known after four or five days that it was much more likely to have been a terrorist attack that it would have been planned. >> piers, i can't even believe you would suggest that ambassador rice would make misleading statements. at the beginning of this, it was very unclear as to what happened. the main thing was rather than make snap judgments that we take a step back, make sure a full investigation was done. >> let me rephrase it. do you accept that ambassador rice was simply wrong? >> well, i think has more informat
the united states. why did the 13 colonies develop as they do? one of the reasons was it was jam packed with natural well-protected harbors in the northeast. and the tempered zone of what is now the united states, it was last resource-rich part of the temperate zone that was settled by europeans at the time of the enlightenment and it had more miles of inland waterways than the rest of the world combined. so that enabled the develment of american nationhood. these facts are so obvious that they get overlooked in the current debate. >> rose: i want to take different countries and look at it to understand your thesis, both in terms of their history and future and elements of their geography that make them who they are take china today. >> okay. all right. take china. china has two big geographical issues. on the one hand, china is big, it's vast. because it's stretching out in terms of the its corporate enterprises, its demography into he ruian far east where there's always this timber, diamonds and gold that the chinese want. a hundred million people in manchuria over the boarder in the
, the city and county of san francisco are supporter of the united states military. san francisco fleetwood association is a nonprofit all volunteer organization that was formed to help organize and execute fleet week. and fleet week in 2012 like 2011 and 2010 has adopted a mission to promote the humanitarian assistance and disaster response missions of the united states military. we also, of course, will have the blue angels and the air show that comes with that. the ships will be coming in and the wonderful liberty call that the wonderful men and women in the armed forces will have in san francisco. the fleet week association also, as i say, has a humanitarian and response. along with the civilian disaster response community, we'll have a senior leader seminar taking place on thursday and friday in which the military and the civilian community learn from one another on how to provide disaster response. i should mention that on wednesday morning out at ocean beach, the marine corps and the navy are setting up what's called the shock trauma platoon, a field hospital you and i might think of
majority -- >> let me ask you what percentage of the hispanic community in the united states does not speak english. how big a barrier is language as you mentioned? >> that's pretty high. >> i think for the youth they speak english it's really interesting because they're the ones translating for their parents. in terms that you have a lot of those that come from latin america, when you look at the politics of latin america they equate politicians to corruption, it is what they do. the idea of having to deal with politics coming tolt united states not necessarily that's like for second nature. they would prefer to not have to go along, work with -- go to school, do what they have to do. they're such a voice and part of our united states that we need them to get more involved in that. >> i think that -- does it make sense for candidates to be fighting so hard, clearly -- >> i'm saying if only ten out of 24 million latinos go to the polls. >> as hard as they fight for young people to go to the polls, i know that as democrats we're counting on high turn out among latinos, among african american
in the united states, that while the other countries are exploring aggressively, how to increase their production, we have just rolled out a new 5 year plan for offshore thrilling that shuts off east coast, delays alaska until 2017, and has least number of leases in it of any program in the history since they passed legislation to get this thing going. anat the same time the deputy is increasing royalty rates and looking at way its decrease lease terms and making it less appealing for companies to come in to to exploration and production here in the united states. neil: we're showing a lot of land that the administration has say you can't drill othere is a lot. argument goes if we were to tap oil from even half of the off limit lands, we would have enough oil to tell the middle east where to get off, is that true? >> absolutely true, consumer energy alliance, released a report a couple weeks ago that shows we could develop if we could bind field bring feels ont yourself to energy efficiency, meaning we would only need 20 to 20% from overseas, and north american energy reserves ar
and largest state in the nation to approve this. one decade later, we have full voting rights in the united states. helping newly enfranchised women, a new political movement was founded. >> starting in the 1920's, it was a movement created by the suffragettes moving forward to getting the right to vote. all of the suffragettes were interested in educating the new voters. >> non-partisan, not endorsing candidates >> -- endorsing candidates, getting the right to vote and one they have their voice heard. >> the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage is taking place throughout the state. bancroft library is having an exhibit that highlights the women's suffrage movement, chronicling what happened in california, bringing women the right to vote. >> how long does this mean going on? >> the week of the 20th. people do not realize that women were allowed to vote as early as the 1920's. in the library collection we have a manuscript from the end of december, possibly longer. >> in commemoration of 100 years of voting in california.
in the united states. i had heard of marcus shelby and had been in join his work but never had the opportunity to meet him. we were brought together by the equal justice society specifically for this project. we were charged with beginning work. marquez and i spent a lot of time addressing our own position on the death penalty, our experiences with people who had been incarcerated, family members, friends of friends. pulling our information. beyond that, we did our own research. to create a picture that resonated with humanity. it is the shape of a house. in this context, it is also small and acts like a cell. i thought that was an interesting play on how these people make these adjustments, half to create home. what is home for these people? the home is their cell. people talk a lot about noise -- very noisy in prisons. that is interesting to me. looking at the communication level, the rise of frustration of being caged, wondering, where does redemption fit into the equation here? [singing] i think both of us really believe the death penalty is wrong, and is flawed for many reasons. the list
of recovery are coming up. better than expected economic data from the united states pushed stock prices of words here in frankfurt. also bit unexpected were quarterly earnings reports, the ones from walmart for example. shares of siemens made an exception, though. they were among the losers on this thursday. siemens says its ceo announced job cuts and cost cuts. profit targets which they had set might not be met within the timeframe that siemens had imagined. >> let's take a quick look at the numbers now in frankfurt. the dax ended the day up by more than 1%. europe -- euro stoxx 50 up by 1.25%. the dow jones almost flat. the euro trading for $1.2929. is there such a thing as clean and affordable energy? >> good question. germany's environment minister believe so, but he says the country has to completely rethink the way it subsidizes renewals. >> with elections due next year, the rising cost of electricity has become an issue. environment minister is calling for a government overhaul of renewable energy. he says current policy favors quantity, not quality. >> we need the appropriate i
calculated we are most per capita spend city in the united states. that's point one which will reflect the fact we are a community supporting arts. we have introduced, as the first city in the united states, neighborhood cultural centers, as a reflection of not only dealing with art, but making sure that art is focused in the neighborhoods. we really want our community to have the opportunity to participate, to deal with, and actually to become involved with art development. recently the city has found its way to make sure that at least 2% of every new construction in city buildings is preserved for art. and this is kind of an extraordinary thing for a city of our size to do. as a result, we have a wide array of lots of cultural and artistic venues for people to take advantage of. >> i wanted to let sfgtv, we have a powerpoint. >> yes, we do. but i'm not quite ready to use it yet but i will hit that button in just a moment. thank you for reminding me. the reputation and promise of the arts commission has been tarnished recently. and i think by looking at our report and reading it, you
sustainability. droughts of course have dried up fields across the united states. the price of corn and soy beans hit record highs. world bank experts are warning that prices could stay high for some time to come. now, kim and the other people meeting down there aren't the only ones with an insider's perspective on the world's financial challenges. central bank governors and finance ministers from leading economies will be meeting later on not too far from here. finance ministers from the group of seven nations last met in april. that was in washington. they too are considering ways to shake off the weight of the debt crisis and stimulate steady growth. representatives of eurozone countries are expected to look for support fortre thfor the re they launched. they want it to help their economy and other markets. >> europe's problems have spread to other places, china notwithstanding and emerging economies. we're going to be hearing more about the g-7 ministers meeting later in the day. we heard from the leaders of the imf and world bank. one political leader we spoke to says the world lacks leaders
be the place that elects the next president of the united states. >> mitt romney out with the begging bowl for votes. will it work though? joining me now is frank. who would have thought that we would be in this position? i think we both thought barack obama was cruising to victory. >> if you were betting big money it would be hard to know who you were putting the money on. >> i think it isn't necessarily that there is a romney surge that will go on to election day. we could be having a completely different discussion after the second debate. >> i'm sure the debate will be exploding. but it is about can barack obama take down mitt romney. if he was to win that debate again, it could be game over. tomorrow night's debate does mat th matter. you are right. but a certain kind of narrative is developing. and if say joe biden had a miserable night and we have another couple of days of news stories, that could be very, very important even though one doesn't think of the vice presidential nominees. >> i like his style. however, he hasn't done any public inner interviews for like five months. >> e
thought we were going to say car, huh? well, what if you were president of the united states? t's...that. on your head? can curlers! tomato basil, potato with bacon... we've got a lot of empty cans. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. we've got a lot of empty cans. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'. [ female announcer ] live the regular life. at the guaranteed's lowest price.attresses plus, pay no interest for 3 years on the best brand-name mattress sets. get your best rest ever from sleep train. ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ >>> our third story, the final factors. our series on the crucial issues in the swing states that are going to decide this election. there is no place more crucial to both c
president of the united states? see life in the best light. outdoors, or in. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. experience life well lit. ask for transitions adaptive lenses. check with your employer to see if your vision plan covers transitions brand lenses. and discover the benefits of adaptive lenses. so you can experience life well lit. >>> our third story, the final factors. our series on the crucial issues in the swing states that are going to decide this election. there is no place more crucial to both candidates, about 30 miles outside washington, d.c. loudoun county. both candidates and their wives have campaigned a lot and president obama even noted how crucial that specific county is to his re-election bid. >> we won loudoun county last time and if we win loudoun county this time, we will win virginia and if we win virginia, we will win this election! >> the latest polls from virginia shows a tightace. well within the margin of error. obama ahead by tw
of the united states out there looking over his shoulder wondering whether his vice- president is going to be supporting him. mrs. ferraro has quite a few differences with vice president mondale, and i understood it when she changed her position on tax credits and buses and to extend the grain embargo. he now says he was against it. if they win, and i hope they don't, but if they win, she will have to accommodate some views, but she will give him the same kind of loyalty i am giving president reagan. we're not far apart on anything. second, i can walk into the oval office any time and he might agree or might not. but he also knows i will be talking about it to the press or knifing him in the back by leaking to make me look good and complicate the problems of the president of united states. >> congresswoman ferraro, your opponent has served in the house of representatives, been ambassador to the united nations, ambassador to china, director of the central intelligence agency and has been vice president for four years. how is your three terms in the house of representatives stacked up aga
in a country where the united states is engaged right now in one of their biggest drone campaigns. authorities are now saying in yemen a gunman assassinate add security official who worked for the u.s. embassy in yemen's capital city. place during a motorcycle drive by. the pentagon confirmed that they sent in a team of 50 marines to bolster security in the middle east amid the protests against the film. a yemen officials tells fox that the killing today was likely a targeted hit from al qaeda and the arabian peninsula. but it is too early to confirm a direct link. the pentagon called the al qaeda branch there "the most dangerous offshoot of the terror group anywhere." so far this year, the united states has conducted more than 30 separate drone strikes inside the borders of yemen, a jump if ten last year. jonathan hunt is live in new york studios. what is the united states saying? >>jonathan: officials are deeply saddened by the murder of the man what worked for the embassy in yemen for something like 11 years. they also say that they condemn what they call this "vicious" murder in the strong
am an honorably discharged united states marine. i served in desert storm. i am a criminal defense attorney for 19 years. i started off my law firm in 2007 and i employ 11 full-time people at my firm. i know what it is like to run a small business. we have strayed far from the principles of limited government. our government taxes and spends out of control and our civil liberties are constantly under attack. we can fix it, but we need to get government back into its cagae. >> our final opening statement is from jeff flake. >> good to be here. two days ago, cheryl and i received a wonderful phone call from my son syan and forming as we are grandparents. aidan was born into a wonderful family, but he was born into $50,000 of debt. his share of the federal debt we all hold. that is why the stakes in this election are so high. we have to have somebody who understands fiscal discipline. that has been my record in the house of representatives, where i fought my own leadership on issues like earmarks. they punish me for it, but i kept at it and we do not have earmarks any more. that is th
. on the other hand, corporations in the united states are in terrific shape, the united states continues to grow. the election is tightening up, which means anybody who is elected is likely to govern from the center, and attack the fiscal cliff. and so you have to say in a low return environment, shares of multinational companies with growing earnings and dividends are probably not a bad place to be. but you want to buy when the markets are down, not when they're up, and you want to sell low quality, buy high quality, and buy them on corrections, not after big moves. i would not be surprised if you have a little bit more of a correction right here. >> susie: so let's talk a little more about this correction. it feels like a correction. between what's going on with oil prices going lower, some of these earnings reports that we've been getting. so what are the risks ahead, and is this a buying opportunity? one strategist saying today that he's pretty upbeat because with central banks around the world pouring money into the financial system, it's kind of hard to see that the global economy will fre
's inconceivable thathe president of the united states three weeks into this tragedy is talking about an internet video and not talking abo terrorism, the terrorists who killed an american ambassador and at the me time, the parent steps fo retribution. lou: >> why are they doing it? >> they are doing it because as was pointed out, we are three-week summer presidential election. lou: the idea that a number of other officials today testified before the committee and acted as if the u.s. ambassador is not dead, two navy seals, four americans, and there doesn't seem to be the slightest concern by the state department that the record be corrected and the reasons for thr death. >> who made that decision? and those those are not decisions made at a low level. the second thing i would like to know is what both attacks started? why did we not try to rescue them and get other forces there, we had other forces in tripoli. what about the military forces that we have in sicily? lou: and the time in which it took for them to be murred by the terrorists. iran and turkey, isn't our expectation we will see more o
] from the united states navy. and of course we have somebody who is an incredible supporters of the fleet week program, mayor ed lee who i am going to turn over the microphone to now. (applause) >> thank you, lewis. welcome. this is the beginning of a great number of events in our city, but i have to say fleet week is really one of my best events. it's one that i've celebrated since just being here and senator feinstein helped reignite it. we were very glad for it to just grow. and, of course, it's a week-long recognition of our armed forces, navy, coast guard, marines. they're all represented here today and i want to give a big shout out and shanks for the men and women in our uniforms who are protecting us. as you know, the world isn't safe. there are a lot of things that are happening. we have to always be ready and vigilant. i think a week out of our very busy calendars to recognize men and women is really an extraordinary opportunity to do that. i also want to give a very big thanks to the fleet week association. it's a great blend. and to have the chair, general, it's b
closer to the united states and they're not krtable with that because they saw nato and turkey and the united states get together and take out qaddafi and they don't want that to happen again to another ally. last but not least this is also putin's primal fear that if he sets up a precedent of supporting an uprising and the international community to back that uprising, they say what if tomorrow there's a russian spring so he doesn't like what's going on in syria at all. >> warner: what message is turkey sending to russia? russia is a major arms supplier to syria. are they saying you can't use turkish arms space to ship arms in? at least not on passenger planes? and can they enforce it? >> there's a gray area of legality and the turks are enforcing it. they are saying we can do this because it ears our airspace and they're probably acting on intelligence that might have come to them from other places. usually if the turks that has kind of intelligence it's not theirs. and the turks -- >> warner: kind of a nato intelligence? >> that's possible and i think the turks felt comfort
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 235 (some duplicates have been removed)

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